Tag Archives: senior exercise

Seniors Falling Is All Too Common

Do you remember your parents telling you to stand up straight, don’t slouch at the dinner table, balance a book on your head while walking? Did they also send you out to play at the first sign of light with a reminder to get yourself home by dinner? If so, you, like many in the Baby Boomer group is no stranger to realizing now why that advice was important and why we need to continue to impart the same to our children and grandchildren. Fitness and good posture are preventative measures to falling.

Every day hundreds of seniors over the age of 65 fall down and cannot get themselves up. They end up with serious or at least temporary injuries from these falls.

The main reason seniors fall is a loss of balance, changes and shifts in the body’s center of gravity and the loss of bone density and muscles happening at the same time make these ‘changes’ ones that need our full attention.

Falls can and do decrease mobility and many times cause seniors to reduce their activity. They may become less independent and less socially active. In essence, the fall changes their lifestyle. Compounding the problem is the fact that many seniors do not ‘share their fall’ with their doctor or family members because they fear losing their independence. Unfortunately, that is exactly what happens, because they stifle the chance for rehabilitative care and/or supportive preventive measures. So in the long run they actually hasten the loss of their independence.

Read the FULL article here

Advertisements

Helping Mom and Dad Regain Their Mobility

It’s not unusual for us here at Home Instead Senior Care to hear stories of elderly parents having fallen or having been laid up for several weeks…Many times we are asked about seniors regaining their strength and suggestions on how best to assist that recovery by family caregivers…

In a nutshell, help get your parents moving. A study has shown that hospitalized elderly patients who work to get back on their feet even by taking short walks around a hospital unit tend to leave the hospital sooner than their more sedentary peers.

The research, conducted at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, draws on data collected from 162 hospitalized patients over age 65. Each patient was fitted with a pager-sized “step activity monitor” attached to his or her ankle – an electronic device capable of counting every step the patient took.

“Using these monitors, we were able to see a correlation between even relatively small amounts of increased mobility and shorter lengths of stay in the hospital,” said Steve Fisher, a UTMB Health assistant professor and lead author on the paper. “We still found this effect after we used a statistical model to adjust for the differing severities of the patients’ illnesses.”

Talk to your parents doctor or health care team about ways that you can get your mom or dad up and around. Most hospitals are eager to help their patients recover and will assist them in daily walks. If you want to supplement that care by assisting your parent, I am fairly certain they would welcome that encouragement. Or, if you are unavailable, consider hiring a caregiver companion who could help your parent in the hospital and/or after they return home as a way to keep your loved one motivated to move as well as to lend a helping hand with household chores such as meal preparation, light housekeeping and medication reminders.

Home Instead CAREGiversSM are screened, trained, bonded and insured, and capable of assisting your parents with several activities of daily living until they regain their strength. Home Instead Senior Care® also makes every effort to match CAREGivers with seniors of similar interests, which is a bonus for many older adults.

For more tips on how you can help your parents realize the important benefits of exercise, click here

Seniors and Exercise Do Mix!

As we age, we need to consider the many factors that relate to better health and consider taking the time we need to take care of ourselves as best we can. We want to make sure that we enjoy life and are able to be as independent as possible for as long as possible. Just know that exercising is important to everyone…Seniors included !

Exercise increases your blood circulation and causes endorphins (feel-good chemicals) to release in your body. PLUS weight-bearing exercises increase bone density! One of the easiest and most inexpensive weight-bearing exercises is simply walking. All you need is a good pair of walking shoes. Resistance exercises will improve muscle mass and stretching exercises will increase muscle flexibility. Swimming and bike riding are great aerobic exercises that can help increase your endurance. In fact, exercising is often a preventative measure for many ailments or diseases. Exercise is one of the very best ways to prevent osteoporosis, which can be a debilitating disease.

Remember exercise is not something that you should do once or twice a month…Exercise needs to be done on a daily basis otherwise the benefits are quickly lost. So, it is very important that when you make an exercise plan you add variety, mixing it up a bit…so you don’t get bored and quit. A good exercise program should become a part of your lifestyle.

BEFORE YOU BEGIN ANY EXERCISE PROGRAM, IT IS IMPORTANT TO CONSULT WITH YOUR PHYSICIAN!